PBIS at DJJ: Waycross RYDC Spring Break DJJ Staff  at:  4/18/2017  
PBIS at DJJ: Waycross RYDC Spring Break



Photos and information from Statewide PBIS Administrator Janette Nihles


In Georgia, April is known for rising temperatures, blooming flowers and the start of spring break for thousands of high school students. At the Department of Juvenile Justice, spring break is equally important to the youth of the Georgia Preparatory Academy in facilities throughout the state as part of the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Team (PBIS) program.












One of the more comprehensive spring break programs at DJJ took place at the Waycross Regional Youth Detention Center (RYDC). Students who met specific behavior and education goals were allowed to participate in a wide range of activities including ping pong, ball games, egg hunts and other games and tournaments. All participating students were rewarded on the final day of their spring break with a cookout featuring hot dogs, hamburgers and a full dessert selection.

























PBIS is an evidence-based, data-driven framework proven to reduce disciplinary incidents, increase a school’s sense of safety and support improved academic outcomes. More than 23,000 U.S. schools are implementing PBIS and saving countless instructional hours otherwise lost to discipline. The premise of PBIS is that continual teaching, combined with acknowledgement or feedback of positive student over the counter behavior, will reduce unnecessary discipline and promote a climate of greater productivity, safety and learning. PBIS schools apply a multi-tiered approach to prevention, using disciplinary data and principles of behavior analysis to develop school-wide, targeted and individualized interventions and supports to improve the school climate for all students. 

To learn more about PBIS at DJJ, visit http://www.djjnewsandviews.org/pbisatdjj/. 








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     DJJ Cares: Mitchell Community Services Office Supports Child Abuse Prevention Month DJJ Staff  at:  4/12/2017  
DJJ Cares: Mitchell Community Services Office Supports Child Abuse Prevention Month




Photo and information provided by JPM Gary Coker



In honor of Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, the Mitchell County Youth Advisory Council (MCYAC) created and placed gardens made of pinwheels in locations around the county. Department of Juvenile Justice staff from the Mitchell Community Services Office (including JPPS II Fredrick Wrenn and JPPS II Mollie Pollock) participated in the event by helping to create the gardens in front of the Mitchell County Board of Education, Camilla City Hall, First Baptist Church of Camilla, Pelham City Hall and Pelham Board of Education.






JPPS II Fredrick Wrenn



National Child Abuse Prevention Month is a time to acknowledge the importance of families and communities working together to prevent child abuse and neglect and to promote the social and emotional well-being of children and families. During the month of April and throughout the year, communities are encouraged to share child abuse and neglect prevention awareness strategies and activities and promote prevention across the country.

To learn more about Child Abuse Prevention Month, visit https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth/.






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     PBIS at DJJ: Elbert Shaw RYDC Employee of the Month DJJ Staff  at:  3/29/2017  
PBIS at DJJ: Elbert Shaw RYDC Employee of the Month




Photo and information provided by Lt. Kristen Nix



Recently, the Elbert Shaw Regional Youth Detention Center (Elbert Shaw RYDC) announced that Officer Grace Jackson of the Security Team was named the Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Employee of the Month for the facility. The PBIS Employee of the Month award is open to all in fields of Safety & Security, Medical, Counselors, Mental Health, Education, Food Service, Maintenance, Business, Personnel, Support Staff and Administration.


To become the PBIS Employee of the Month at the Elbert Shaw RYDC, employees must:



  • Possess a positive attitude towards work responsibilities, co-workers, youth and be willing to serve as a role model for others.




  • Show a willingness to exercise servant-leadership, take initiative and accept and carry out additional responsibilities beyond the regular job assignments for the good of DJJ.




  • Be consistent, dependable and punctual in reporting for duty.




According to her co-workers and supervisors, Officer Grace Jackson is "is an efficient and effective employee. She knows and understands the responsibilities and boundaries of her job duties. She is able to provide professional and supportive responses in difficult situations to students and co-workers. She is a proficient and positive worker whom is never seen just sitting idling; she is either engaged with a youth or has a broom or rag in her hand completing tasks to aid in sanitation of the facility. She has never been heard to complain about any assigned job duty. She is consistently assigned to the class with the most challenging behavioral students or potential conflictual situations and is able to maintain the post without issue (and without personal complaint). She is always positive when she greets co-workers and students. She demonstrates appropriate boundaries in carrying out her job duties and treats the students with respect and kindness while still maintaining appropriate control and security measures. She uses appropriate language towards and around the youth. She demonstrates great initiative in getting things done instead of waiting around to be told what needs to be done. She is a great example for new employees to learn by."

PBIS is an evidence-based, data-driven framework proven to reduce disciplinary incidents, increase a school’s sense of safety and support improved academic outcomes. More than 23,000 U.S. schools are implementing PBIS and saving countless instructional hours otherwise lost to discipline. The premise of PBIS is that continual teaching, combined with acknowledgement or feedback of positive student behavior, will reduce unnecessary discipline and promote a climate of greater productivity, safety and learning. PBIS schools apply a multi-tiered approach to prevention, using disciplinary data and principles of behavior analysis to develop school-wide, targeted and individualized interventions and supports to improve the school climate for all students.

To learn more about PBIS at DJJ, visit http://www.djjnewsandviews.org/pbisatdjj/.




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     DJJ Cares: Muscogee County CSO DJJ Staff  at:  3/22/2017  
DJJ Cares: Muscogee County CSO


On March 20, 2017, DJJ Muscogee County CSO staff and youth participated in a two-hour Service Learning Project at Feeding the Valley Food Bank. Feeding the Valley is a regional food bank in Columbus and is the outlet for receiving and distributing donated food, produce and grocery products.



Thirteen DJJ staff and six youth supervised by the CSO were educated on the impact of hunger on Georgia families while they boxed eight pallets of nonperishable food items that will feed 687 families throughout the Columbus-Phoenix City, Alabama area.










 



 


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     PBIS at DJJ: Loftiss RYDC FET Award DJJ Staff  at:  3/29/2017  
PBIS at DJJ: Loftiss RYDC FET Award

Photos and information from Statewide PBIS Administrator Janette Nihles


Recently, the Loftiss Regional Youth Detention Center’s (Loftiss RYDC) Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Team (PBIS) accepted a statewide award for having the highest overall Facility Evaluation Tool (FET) score for PBIS organizations at the Department of Juvenile Justice. FET testing is conducted twice per year to gauge the effectiveness of the PBIS program in specific juvenile facilities. This year, FET testing was overseen by Dr. Kristine Jolivette of the University of Alabama to help ensure the objectivity of the process. The Loftiss RYDC staff was presented the award at the PBIS Statewide Facility Team Leader Training.

PBIS is an evidence-based, data-driven framework proven to reduce disciplinary incidents, increase a school’s sense of safety and support improved academic outcomes. More than 23,000 U.S. schools are implementing PBIS and saving countless instructional hours otherwise lost to discipline. The premise of PBIS is that continual teaching, combined with acknowledgement or feedback of positive student over the counter behavior, will reduce unnecessary discipline and promote a climate of greater productivity, safety and learning. PBIS schools apply a multi-tiered approach to prevention, using disciplinary data and principles of behavior analysis to develop school-wide, targeted and individualized interventions and supports to improve the school climate for all students.

To learn more about PBIS at DJJ, visit http://www.djjnewsandviews.org/pbisatdjj/.









 











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