DJJ Commissioner Congratulates Governor On Signing of Juvenile Justice Reforms Bill

On May 2nd, Department of Juvenile Justice Commissioner Avery D. Niles congratulated Governor Nathan Deal on the passage and signing of Georgia’s massive juvenile justice reform legislation in the Senate. Based on the recommendations of a special panel convened by Governor Deal, the goal of the legislation is to reduce the number of repeat juvenile offenders and bring down costs. READ MORE HERE

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE OFFICE OF TRAINING JUVENILE JUSTICE REFORM OVERVIEW QUICK TIP SHEET FROM FEBRUARY 2014......

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Could Florida Learn A Thing Or Two From Georgia's Recent Criminal Justice Reforms?

    As Florida looks to make sure released inmates don't return to prison, should the Sunshine state look to other states, like Georgia, to learn about their criminal justice reforms? Housing about 102,000 inmates, Florida's prison system is the third-largest in the U.S. According to state economists, that number is projected to increase in the next few years. A contributing factor is the number of released inmates going back to prison. Recently, some, including current and former Florida officials, heard from their counterparts in Georgia about efforts there to reduce recidivism… "In Georgia, we have about 55,000 inmates in our Department of Corrections and about 10 million people in Georgia. So, our population and our prison population are exactly half of yours down here in Florida. However, we have the same exact number of people on probation as you do."

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  • Engaging faith-based groups next step in criminal justice overhaul

    Gainesville — The toughest part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s criminal justice overhaul depends largely on help from faith-based groups, and the governor has begun an unprecedented outreach to religious organizations to fight stubborn recidivism rates.

    Deal wants to institutionalize what has been a largely informal effort to rely on volunteers to mentor and counsel released offenders. But building and sustaining a statewide network won’t be easy, and research suggests the work could have mixed results.

    Still, Deal is putting his office’s heft behind the effort in hopes it brings lasting changes to recidivism rates that have remained relatively stable despite a long-term increase in corrections spending. It’s a long-term effort for a governor who has spent a chunk of his political capital in pursuit of a lasting criminal justice overhaul.

    “We need you,” Deal said during a Sunday sermon at Gainesville’s First Baptist Church, his house of worship since the 1960s. “We need you to set an example — to welcome, to assist, to provide and to make sure that those who are willing to change the directions of their lives will find a helping hand.”

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